February Book Releases

Photo by Susan Yin

 Non-fiction

The Salt Path by Raynor Winn (7th Feb, PB). 

When Raynor and Moth lost the life they’d always known in one fell swoop, they decided to confront homelessness and terminal illness head-on, by walking the 630 mile South West Coast Path. Shortlisted for the Wainwright Prize and in the running for The 2018 Costa books of the year, this is an extraordinary true story of the power that nature can have in restoring hope when everything seems lost.

Diary of a Drag Queen by Crystal Rasmussen (7th Feb). 

Northern, working-class and shagging men three times her age, Crystal writes candidly about her search for ‘the one’. Charting her day-to-day adventures, we encounter tucks, twists and sucks, heinous overspending and endless nights spent sprinting from problem to problem in a full face of makeup.

The Unwinding of the Miracle by Julie Kip-Williams (14th Feb).

A book that demands that you contemplate your own fragility and how you live your one precious life. This is the inspiring memoir by a young mother with terminal cancer.

The Source: Open Your Mind, Change Your Life by Dr Tara Swart (14th Feb). 

Backed up by recent discoveries in cognitive science, respected neuroscientist Dr Tara Swart shows us that we all have the power to attract what we most desire into our lives.

Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace Wells (19th Feb). 

‘What does it mean to be entertained by apocalypse when we stare down the possibility of a real one?’ Uninhabitable Earth is the must-read book on climate change by David Wallace Wells, author of this game-changing article in New York Magazine, that amassed over 7 million views overnight.

Mary Berry’s Quick Cooking by Mary Berry (21st Feb). 

The nation’s queen of home cooking brings her foolproof, delicious approach to quick fix cooking in this brand-new, official tie-in to the major BBC One series.

Threads by William Henry Searle (21st Feb).

Weaving together personal stories, Threads deals with the meanings of intimacy, vulnerability and our affinities with people and places, both wild and tame. It is a deep exploration of the encounters that lend quiet networks of grace to our busy lives.

The Five by Hallie Rubenhold (28th Feb). 

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are all famous for the same thing. They were murdered by Jack the Ripper. But who were these women? In a devasting narrative Hallie Rubenhold shares their lives: who they were, how they lived and who loved them.

Photo by Mervyn Chan

Fiction

Out of the Dark by Gregg Hurwitz (7th Feb).

Assassin and all-round lethal weapon Evan Smoak seeks out corruption on the highest level, when the most hard-to-reach target appears on his hit list: the President of the United States of America. Out of the Dark is the most daring and explosive thriller yet from Hollywood screenwriter Gregg Hurwitz.

Still Me by Jojo Moyes (7th Feb, PB).

 This is the final chapter of the Lou Clarke trilogy which started with the tear-jerking, wonderfully unique Me Before You (also the major film staring Sam Claflin and Emilia Clarke). This book finds Lou in New York – how will Lou adapt to life the other side of the pond?

Shenzhen by Guy Delisle (7th Feb).

After Pyongyang, his book about the strange society that is North Korea, Delisle turned his attention to Shenzhen, the cold, urban city in Southern China that is sealed off with electric fences and armed guards from the rest of the country. The result is another brilliant graphic novel – funny, scary, utterly original and illuminating.

Stranger Things by Gwena Bond (7th Feb)

Set before the events of the TV series, this prequel novel follows Eleven’s mother and her time as a test subject in the MKUltra program.

I Owe You One by Sophie Kinsella (7th Feb)

The irresistible new standalone from Sophie Kinsella is a story of love, empowerment and an IOU that changes everything…

Paris Echo by Sebastian Faulks (14th Feb, PB). 

The new novel from the bestselling author of Birdsong and Where My Heart Used to Beat. American postdoctoral researcher Hannah and runaway Moroccan teenager Tariq have little in common, yet both are susceptible to the daylight ghosts of Paris. In this urgent and deeply moving novel, Faulks deals with questions of empire, grievance and identity.

By |2019-01-29T11:56:59+00:00January 29th, 2019|0 Comments

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